Maple Oat Scones With Espresso Glaze

I love-loath Sundays. I don’t like to make plans on Sunday and I secretly judge people that plan an event that requires me to leave the house on a Sunday. We can still be friend but if we’re to be really good friends, this has to cease. The only outing I’ll consider on a Sunday is one that involves equal parts booze and really delicious food (and even then I have to be able to wear soft clothes). If this isn’t happening, I’m bunkered in the house, sweats on and hair in shambles. That’s everything and more to love about a Sunday.

The loath-part comes when the reality of Monday starts creeping into the periphery. It does this in the form of laundry and, sometimes, the need to work on your schedule for the upcoming week. Sometimes it’s an errand that requires too much effort that my kids forgot to mention to me (I need poster board!). Poster board might not seem like a big deal…but living in the sticks, it takes effort.

This morning I had to clean my kitchen and do laundry. Both highly annoying, but necessary, evils. I’m glad it’s done so we can talk about these scones. I started making these last year and then they died off in the summer…who wants a maple oat scone when it’s hot as balls out?  I don’t. But now that the leaves are turning colors and it’s actually getting cooler (and by that I mean low 80s…so annoying), the time has come to dust off the maple oat scone recipe and share with you. This has all kinds of cool morning flavors: maple, oats, cinnamon and espresso. I use the same technique as my other scones, the most important things to remember are: a) resist the desire to over-futz with your dough; b) give your dough a quick freeze before baking. Both are crucial to scone-making success. Additionally there are several flours here…don’t deviate. Different flours have different protein levels and they will totally change your scone by either making them too tough or the dough too wet. Listen to me grasshopper and you shall succeed (plus I use these flours in lots of recipes…I’ll list them below for reference). Happy Sunday lovies.

Before We Get Started

  • Maple Syrup. You have to use 100% pure maple syrup. Without it, the recipe won’t work. I’ve tried subbing in the imitation stuff and it was a disaster. Don’t do it.
  • White Whole Wheat Flour. I simply love the stuff. It adds that delicious wheat flavor to baked goods without the density.
  • Flour. This recipe is a wee high maintenance with three flours in one recipe. I mean, seriously? Who do I think I am?!?! But before you think I’m an asshole and ignore this recipe, I beg you to reconsider. We use the all-purpose because of it’s stability, cake flour for it’s tenderness and the white whole wheat for its’ taste and fluffiness. Together this trio makes a perfectly tender, flavorful scone. Do it.
  • Espresso. I’m an espresso junkie, I’m not going to lie. But I recently started making cold brew concentrate and it works beautifully in place of the espresso. If you don’t have access to either use fresh-brewed strong coffee and you’re good. You got this.
  • Maple Extract. I feel so white trash when I use imitation extracts. So just know that when I do, I do it with purpose and not haphazardly. Pure maple syrup doesn’t impart the same flavor in the glaze. In fact you would have to use so much maple syrup that the glaze would be one sticky mess. So just a drop of the maple extract really pulls out that maple flavor. If you’re taking a moral stand against it, I respect you and you can just move forward without it.

Let’s bake some scones, shall we?

Maple Oat Scones With Espresso Glaze

Makes 16 Scones

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 3/4 cups cake flour
  • 1 ½ cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup white whole-wheat flour (if you use regular whole-wheat it will alter the consistency of the scone)
  • 1 cup old fashion oatmeal, plus more for sprinkling on top
  • 1 tablespoons baking powder
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/3 cup light brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt
  • 3/4 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2/3 cup real maple syrup (don’t use the fake stuff, only 100% maple syrup or it will change the consistency of the scones)
  • 2 large egg
  • 3/4 cup chopped pecans (optional)
  • 1 cup cold unsalted butter (two sticks, 8 oz), cut into 16 chunks

Espresso Schmooey

  • 2 cups powdered sugar
  • 2 tablespoons real maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon fresh brewed espresso or strong coffee…plus extra to thin the schmooey (you can also use milk to thin the schmooey if you want a more subtle coffee flavor)
  • 1 small drop of maple extract (this stuff is imitation, but it really brings out the maple syrup flavor…trust me on this)
  • Use milk or cream to thin consistency if desired

To Garnish

  • 3 tablespoons old fashion oats
  • 3 tablespoons chopped pecans

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. In a large bowl, whisk together the cake flour, all-purpose flour, white whole-wheat flour, oatmeal, baking powder, granulated sugar, brown sugar, cinnamon and sea salt.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together the cream, maple syrup and eggs. Set aside.
  3. Sprinkle your 16 pieces of cold, cut butter over the flour mixture. Using a pastry blender, two forks or your hands, work the butter into the flour until the butter is the size of peas.
  4. If you’re using the pecans, sprinkle them over the top of the flour-butter mixture.
  5. Drizzle the cream mixture on top of the flour and, using a fork, start to stir until a ball begins to form.
  6. Heavily flour your hands and lightly flour a cutting board (or whatever surface you’re going to use).
  7. Dump the scone dough onto the floured cutting board. It should be a loose ball at this point. Separate the dough into four equal-sized balls.
  8. Pat each dough ball into a flattened disc, about 1-inch thick. It’s important that the sides of the disc are 90 degree angles.
  9. Cover a baking sheet with parchment paper. Give it a light dusting with flour and put the scone discs on the baking sheet.
  10. Put the scones in the freezer for 15-30 minutes.
  11. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees F and move an oven rack to the top third of the oven, about six inches from the top of the oven.
  12. Pull the scones out of the freezer and using a very sharp knife (I use my bread knife) cut each disc into four scones, so that you have 16 scones total. Do not use a see-saw action when cutting your scones.
  13. Place the scones on a parchment-covered baking sheet. Make sure you leave 2 healthy inches between each scone.
  14. Bake for 16 minutes. Once out of the oven, let rest for about 10-15 minutes in a draft-free area.
  15. While they’re cooling, prepare your glaze. Mix all glaze ingredients (powdered sugar, maple syrup, espresso and maple extract) in a medium bowl until completely smooth. Taste and adjust flavor as necessary. If it’s too thick, add more espresso (or milk) to thin it; if it’s too thin, add more powdered sugar.
  16. If using the oats and pecans on top, place in a skillet and cook over medium low until toasty and you start to smell the pecans. Don’t let them burn.
  17. Place more parchment on top of a cooling rack. Set the scones on the parchment to cool a bit more.
  18. Drizzle the schmooey on top and sprinkle with toasted oats and pecans. Scones are best the day you make them, but stored at room temperature in an air-tight container they will last for several days.

**This is an updated version of a previously published recipe…as noted by the slightly out-of-date On My Mind thoughts below. ;)  Sending lots of peace and love! xo

On My Mind

 

 

9 Comments

  • Mary Ann | The Beach House Kitchen 2017/09/29 at 1:30 AM

    I absolutely LOVE the flavors going on in these scones Rebecca! That glaze…OMG! These will be happening very soon at my house! Perfect for lazy weekends with a nice hot cup of morning coffee! The temps are dipping here, so these are going to be perfect! Keeping my fingers crossed for cooler weather heading your way soon!

    Reply
  • Karen 2017/09/24 at 9:00 PM

    Just made these yesterday and they turned out beautifully! I couldn’t locate white whole wheat flour but used whole wheat pastry flour instead with a really nice result. The multiple flours (and sifting) really were key!

    Reply
    • Rebecca Firth 2017/09/25 at 2:46 AM

      Thank you so much for this note Karen!!! I’m so glad you loved them and I love your swap!!! xoxo

      Reply
  • fatimah 2017/09/23 at 12:48 AM

    love love love this!! must make them, just beautiful xx

    Reply
    • Rebecca Firth 2017/09/23 at 12:53 AM

      Awwww thank you Fatimah!!!! I wish you lived closer — I would love to share the ones in my kitchen!!! xoxo

      Reply
  • Olivia 2015/10/26 at 1:35 AM

    These look simply scrumptious! I must find time in my week to make these.

    Reply
  • Jessica | A Happy Food Dance 2015/10/26 at 1:05 AM

    Are you in my brain?! I feel the same way about Sundays. I want to wear the same thing I slept in for as long as possible, the only plans I want to make are ones I can easily get out of, and I am totally mourning the fact that Monday is so close. Wahhhh! Like right now! And the scone queen has done it again – these look perfect and I love the schmooey – more things should be referred to as schmooey. Good luck on your Monday!

    Reply
    • DisplacedHousewife 2015/10/26 at 1:15 AM

      Jessica,
      It’s brutal!! Good luck with your Monday too…I always love your comments pengyou!! xox

      Reply

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