Petite Raspberry + Blueberry Scones With Hella Lemon Glaze

My life has consisted of two meals lately: noodles and scones. I’ve been messing around with chow mein noodles, rice noodles, pad Thai noodles and zucchini noodles (which we’re calling vasta, right???). I’ve been dressing them in slightly spicy peanut sauce, a thicker soy-based sauce or a heavy-on-the-sesame sauce. Sort of like my own little culinary version of My Size Barbie or a Spice Girl. They fit every mood and taste bud whim.

Noodles have been satisfying my every savory desire. But I have more needs. Many more. I must have more than just salty, belly-filling meals. My other needs are oh-so-much more, how shall I say, demanding? This need is for sweets. I’m talking sugar (brown and white, we don’t discriminate here), butter (unsalted, always) and full-fat cream. This is the neediest of needs and requires something swathed in sweetness at regular intervals. Sometimes this need has to be met with much more frequency than at other times. Currently, it’s doing the full-court press. And who am I to protest?

Because of some projects I’ve been working on, it’s all about the scone in our house. Scones are like little breakfast cakes that you get to pretend are totally normal to eat for breakfast…but they should actually be a dessert. Around here, they’re breakfast, dessert and in-between snacks. We shove them in lunch boxes, wrap them in paper towels on our way to school and cozy them up to a glass of wine at the end of the day. We’ve had them with dried apricots, cherries, five-spice powder, blueberries, cardamom, oats, maple, pecans, espresso, vanilla bean…if you can chop it and dice it, it’s getting shoved into a scone. Oh, and the zest. We can’t forget the zest. I have so much bald fruit shriveling on the counter it’s a little sad (I have lemon and tangerine bars in the to-make queue…really, I do).

I already have three scone recipes up on the blog (pumpkin, cherry and tangerine), but I believe we need another. Let me tell you why. First, because of said projects, I have acquired a host of scone-making tips that you need to know. Like, yesterday needed to know. They’ll make this breakfast nugget that much more heavenly. Second, because putting raspberries in your scone dough can be a bitch. It’s messy, complicated and requires a little handholding along the way. Much like some of my past relationships…but that’s a story for another day.

Oh-So-Important Scone-Making Tips:

  • Freezing Your Dough. I cannot emphasize enough the importance of freezing your scone dough. In previous recipes I have suggested a minimum of 30 minutes in the freezer. This does a couple of things. First, it will give you a higher rise once this dough hits the heat of the oven. Second, it makes this moist dough much easier to deal with. I have become incredibly cocky when it comes to freezing dough, oftentimes leaving it in the freezer overnight. I’m a bit maniacal that after a quick freeze (say, 60 minutes?), you then wrap it tightly in parchment paper, then plastic wrap, then foil and then place in a re-sealable plastic bag so as not to lose any extra moisture (I like me some moist scones…I’m a little OCD about it). However, I recently made scone dough, placed it in the freezer and went wine tasting. Totally normal. And P.S., I totally forgot about them. Next morning I shuffled to the freezer and thought, crap, I’ve ruined them. Popped them in the oven (straight from the freezer) and they were perfection. If they have been frozen for longer than an hour, make sure to tack on a minute or two to the bake time. Also, if you have fresh fruit in the frozen scone (such as blueberries, raspberries, etc.), check to make sure the dough closest to the fruit is cooked through.
  • Flour. I cannot emphasize enough the importance of using cake flour in this recipe. You could use all-purpose flour for the entire recipe, but it will not yield the same fluffy finished product. It’s worth it. You can make your own cake flour at home. For every 1 cup of cake flour, use 1 cup of all-purpose flour. Then take 2 tablespoons of all-purpose flour out, and put 2 tablespoons of cornstarch in. Everyone and their mother will tell you to sift the flour and cornstarch combo 6 times. I grab my whisk and fluff the ingredients around a bit and keep working. You decide on which approach you’d like to take.
  • Raspberries + Blueberries. Adding the raspberries is going to be a bit messy and it will make your dough feel a bit odd (almost slick). They’re going to break and you might even have a bit of a panic attack and think you’re doing it wrong. You’re not. Punch on through. You can do it. Also, make sure that you clean and dry your fruit (completely) in advance of adding it to the dough. Likewise make sure it is fresh, ripe and firm. If the fruit is overripe it will bleed like hell all over the dough. The fruit will bleed regardless, however overripe fruit will make it worse. We want pretty streaks, not a crime scene.
  • Baking Powder. Go for the aluminum-free baking powder. Scones can be a bit on the blonde side and the aluminum in baking powder can give them this faint, bluish hue. It’s not a deal breaker, but if you’re at the store pick up the non-aluminum kind.
  • Humidity. This might be the most humidity-sensitive dough I have ever worked with. The below measurements are perfect for average humidity. If it’s really humid, you should add in 1 more tablespoon of all-purpose flour. If it’s dry out, I would add an extra tablespoon of cream.
  • Master Recipe. Consider this a ‘master’ scone recipe. You can create all sorts of combinations with this…make it your own. Chocolate chip? Orange? Get creative people.

Let’s bake betches.

petite raspberry + blueberry scones | Recipe via DisplacedHousewife

petite blueberry + raspberry scones | Recipe via DisplacedHousewife

petite raspberry 
+ 
blueberry scones 
with hella lemon schmooey

Makes 16 Petite Scones

INGREDIENTS

For the Scones

  • 1 1/2 cups cake flour
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour plus 3 tablespoons
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder, non-aluminum
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 generous tablespoon lemon zest (about 1 lemon)
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 8 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut in 8 pieces
  • 2/3 cup cold cream (you can substitute with any milk…whatever you have in the fridge…they won’t be as moist if you use less fat)
  • 1 large egg
  • 2/3 cup fresh blueberries, washed and dried completely
  • 2/3 cup raspberries, washed and dried completely
  • 1 tablespoon cream (for the top of the scone)
  • 1 egg (for the top of the scone)
  • 3 tablespoons sugar (for the top of the scone)

For the Glaze

  • 2 cup of powdered sugar
  • Juice from 1 lemon and about 1 tablespoon of zest
  • 1 tablespoon of cream

INSTRUCTIONS

  • Mix your cake flour, all-purpose flour, salt, baking powder, lemon zest and cinnamon. I use a fork here. You can grab a whisk to use but then you’re just dirtying up one more utensil…and you’ll need the fork for step four. Say that twenty times fast.
  • Sprinkle in 2/3 cup of sugar and evenly distribute.
  • Cut in the butter using a pastry blender, two forks or your hands. Make sure the butter is pretty evenly mixed in, with a healthy smattering of pea-sized chunks of butter throughout.
  • Mix the egg and 2/3 cup of cream together in a separate bowl and then drizzle over the flour mixture. Using your fork, fluff around a bit more until a dough is starting to form. I usually get in there with my hands to force the issue. If it looks like it could use a couple of kneads to form a ball of dough, I do that…but not too aggressively. Max out at about five-ish kneads. Slap that thing around until you have a relatively cohesive ball of dough. I do all of this in the mixing bowl.
  • Lift the dough up and sprinkle the fruit on the bottom of the bowl. Set the dough down and gently press it into the fruit. Then flip the dough over and fold the dough onto itself, like a taco shell and press it together. Gently work the fruit into the dough in as few presses as possible. It will be a bit messy. Fruit will break and bleed a bit. That’s ok. It will look pretty in the end. Promise.
  • Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper or a silpat. If using the parchment, dust with some flour. Flour up your hands really well.
  • Separate the dough into 4 equal-size lumps on top of the parchment/silpat and mold into discs, about an inch thick. Don’t overwork your dough. You just want them to look relatively circular and even. To me, scones are rustic and that’s part of their charm. A really smooth and polished scone makes me nervous. Like someone that never smiles.
  • If your hands are getting sticky, add more flour. Just know that there is a fine line with flour here. Add enough that your dough is super easy to work with and you run the risk of having dry scones. Don’t add enough and it will be a hot sticky mess, enough to send you to the sanitarium.
  • In a small bowl, whisk together the 1 tablespoon of cream and egg.
  • Using a pastry brush (or whatever you have on hand), brush the cream and egg mixture on top of the 4 dough discs.
  • Then sprinkle, with a heavy hand (which is usually my advice for all sugar- or alcohol-based concoctions), the sugar on top of the dough discs.
  • Pop the discs, uncovered, into the freezer. Set the timer for a minimum of 30 minutes. I recommend something closer to 1 hour. At that point, either bake the scones or wrap them tightly (as noted above) and freeze until you are ready to eat them.
  • Pre-heat your oven to 400 degrees F.
  • Pull the scones out of the freezer. Using a sharp knife (I love my bread knife for this), cut each disc into 4, equal-size scones (yielding 16 cute, petite scones total). When cutting, make sure to press down quickly and lift straight up. If you wiggle the knife in there or use a sawing action, your sides won’t have a nice, defined edge.
  • Pull the scones at least two inches away from each other…they need room to expand. You can gently loosen the bottoms with a spatula if they’re sticking a bit. Some recipes tell you to keep the scones pretty close together while baking as it will help them rise up. However, if they’re too close, the scones will grow back together and be kinda mushy on the sides. Error on the side of space.
  • Set the timer for 13 minutes. Start watching them around the 13 minute mark to see how they’re doing. Make sure the area around the fruit is cooked through (especially if they were frozen solid). Don’t go over on the time looking for a bronze tinge. As soon as you see a light tan around the edges, pull them out. They should look firm on the tops and not dough-like, but not even close to George Hamilton dark.
  • Set the scones on a cooling rack. After about 5ish minutes, you should be able to take them off of the baking sheet and let them finish cooling on the rack.
  • While the scones are cooling…grab a bowl and whip up the glaze. Mixing schmooey is a tango…listen to what it wants and needs. Throw the zest, juice, powdered sugar and cream in a bowl and mix away. Does it need more powdered sugar? More lemon juice? Add more of each in little bits until you get the right consistency…which is when it is thin enough to drizzle, yet thick enough to stop in its’ tracks and not just run off the scone. Let it sit and mingle while the scones cool. Smear the schmooey on top and you’re done.
  • These are best the day that they are made. However, if you wrap them up tightly and store at room temperature, you can happily serve the next day as well. Tootles.
{ on my mind }
  • Tall People & Heart Attacks. Did you read this study? I feel so much better. Good to know I’m on the right path. Now pass the scones.
  • Noodles + Scones. I think I just found the title of my autobiography.
  • Chick Update. It’s only been a week, but I’m a convert. They are positively adorbs. We got three Cochin chicks for our squeaky clean coop and they’ve been happily shitting away. This particular breed is originally from China and is also called Chinese Shanghai. Which sounds a little like calling me United States Los Angeles. The kids and I felt that this was meant to be: little expat Chinese chicks finding their way into our home. We have a red-orange one, white one and a black one. Stella and I named ours Nugget and Laowai. Gavin named his Esther. I love that. Esther. Many of you don’t know this but my skin is white. As in, super white. As in, one of my friends once described it as ‘alabaster’. ‘Laowai’ means foreigner in Mandarin. The last time I was in China I was cruising the outskirts of Beijing (furniture shopping) and a group of young kids were following me shouting “Laowai! Laowai!” over and over and over again. It felt the equivalent of yelling “Honky! Honky!”, alerting the locals that a pale face was on the premises. And thus, my white chicken from China has been anointed Laowai. It seems fitting, doesn’t it?
  • Spring Break. Both of my kid’s sport’s teams had practice over the break. That’s weird, right? Every morning someone would say: “Don’t forget we have practice tonight.” And then before bed someone would say: “We forgot practice again.” Just like that. For a week.
  • Summer Lunch. Did you know that for many kids their school lunch is their one meal of the day? Did you ever think about what happens once summer hits and there’s no more school? They lose that one meal. I honestly didn’t know this until I had kids. It makes me tremendously sad. Read more here on how they’re trying to bridge that summer gap. Good things are happening; but we can do better. Let’s do it.
  • Scone Lady. My cousin recently called me ‘The Scone Lady’. Not wild about this. I think I’m too, how shall I say, young for this? I’m still in my salad days…they’re not gone yet. Let’s come up with a better name, shall we?
  • Boom. We were walking down the beach bike path recently and this guy was weaving through the crowd on his Cruiser with a boom box in the basket (as in a retro 80s boom box) blaring the song Move Bitch. I bet it was on cassette. Everyone was cracking up, including my kids. On the way home from school my son said that someone said, ‘Boom!’ at school and he replied, ‘Get out the way, get out the way.’ If you don’t know the lyrics, look ’em up. Super proud parent moment. Respect.
  • This last photo (below) is of the scones with only raspberries. Love it.
  • Happy sunny days. xx

petite raspberry scones | Recipe via DisplacedHousewife #scones #baking #tips #breakfast @displacedhousewife

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12 Comments

  • Jacelyn 2016/06/26 at 9:54 AM

    Hello! I have tried making these scones few weeks back and they are really awesome! Thanks so much for sharing! I’m thinking of making another batch now and freezing them for future use. How Long would you recommend to keep them for in the freezer without compromising on the taste?

    Reply
    • DisplacedHousewife 2016/06/26 at 6:47 PM

      I’m so happy you liked them Jacelyn!! I usually only keep mine in the freezer for a couple of weeks and they’re fine. I’m thinking you could go up to a month-ish? Let me know your results!! xox

      Reply
  • Molly 2015/08/17 at 5:34 PM

    I made these on Saturday and they came out perfectly! Your hand holding on mixing the in berries helped tremendously, and even the note about the dough being slick – without that I would have been freaking out!
    Here’s my question though: I still have two little lumps of dough in the freezer (wrapped in parchment, plastic and a baggie thankyouverymuch) – should I defrost for a bit before I bake them? Or just pop ’em in the oven and give them a little more time? Or both…

    Reply
    • DisplacedHousewife 2015/08/17 at 6:04 PM

      Hi Molly! First, thanks for the nice comment!! I’m glad you liked the recipe. You can pop them in the oven, straight from the freezer, and just add a couple-three more minutes. They should be lightly tanned, and check the area around the berries for doneness. Right around the berries will take longest to bake. Enjoy!! xx

      Reply
  • Amanda Paa 2015/04/16 at 4:29 PM

    your scone tips are spot on! i never use baking powder that has aluminum, but i had no idea it gave a bluish color. i love the looks of the lemon schmooey. i wish my mom would have made scones when i was young, but she always thought they were dry – but i worked hard to perfect a soft, flaky gluten-free version too. and they’re the best!

    ps – i need to see pics of those chicks!!

    xo, amanda

    Reply
    • DisplacedHousewife 2015/04/22 at 10:57 PM

      Hi Amanda,
      I’m such a slacker — I can’t believe it’s taken me so long to respond!!! I totally prefer non-aluminum for health reasons…but sometimes (somehow) it winds up in my cupboard! I will work on photos of the chicks…and I want to check out your tender gluten-free scones — that sounds amazing (and quite a feat!). xx

      Reply
  • Molly 2015/04/15 at 7:37 PM

    Oy, “Scone Lady” – I feel ya on that one – almost as cringeworthy as when I hear someone call me “Ma’am” – am I beyond the “Miss” years already?!? To me, you can be my Scone Sista- sounds a little more age appropritate (I’m assuming we are around the same age based on some of the nostalgia you’ve written about). Every time I make your scone recipes, people go gaga over them – my Mom told me the other day it was probably the best scone she’s ever had. :)
    Thank you for the great recipes and inspiration and better yet, the amusing writing that resonates with me so well! Scone Sistas unite!(insert knucks emoji here) xo

    Reply
    • DisplacedHousewife 2015/04/15 at 9:31 PM

      Hi Molly!! It just kills me that I can’t insert emojis in here. A fist bump would be perfect. I love that you make my scones (and other stuff)…it warms my heart!! Funny we’re virtual scone sistas living in the same town, right?? Happy baking pengyou!! xx

      Reply
  • Lynn | The Road to Honey 2015/04/15 at 12:39 PM

    Oh my goodness. I’m still reeling with laughter over the “on my mind section” (not the summer lunch thing. . .that’s sad and was reality for many of the kids in Kenya).

    It was mzungu for me while I was living in Nairobi. The next name for my pet? Mmmm . . maybe not. . .

    And the boom box adventure. . .can you still buy those?

    In all seriousness, these scones look divine. I too could be classified as scone lady myself (what can I say I like “cake in disguise” for breakfast) but have been trying to be good and eat more nutritionally sound meals to start my day. But these would make a nice treat as I especially love berries and lemon.

    Reply
    • DisplacedHousewife 2015/04/15 at 8:46 PM

      Lynn — I love it: cake in disguise!! It’s perfect. And I’m thinking you must be able to procure a boom box somehow?? This seems very Craig’s List..don’t you think?? Let me know if you make these pretties, Scone Lady Too!! xx

      Reply
  • Jessica | A Happy Food Dance 2015/04/14 at 11:43 PM

    Ok – where are these damn noodles you keep talking about?! (sorry – the hangry rage is coming out!) I’m just really looking forward to them! Scones are one of my favorite acceptable breakfasts because you’re right, it’s dessert. I’ve never paired one with wine, which is making me want to give you the biggest bear hug, because now that’s all I can think about doing!

    Reply
    • DisplacedHousewife 2015/04/15 at 8:31 PM

      Hi Jessica! Wine + scones are natural partners. The sugar high alone makes it a winning combo. So…the noodles. My chive noodles still need some massaging. I learned there is a fine line between charring a chive and burning the crap out of it. BUT, the chow mein…we were very happy with that and it’s going to be a Shut Up & Eat…soon-ish. It’s coming…promise!! xx

      Reply

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